Volkswagen Magazine

Greatest Canadian drives?

There are plenty of great drives in Canada, some of which will take you far off the beaten path and into a kind of wilderness you may have never experienced before. There are almost too many great options to list, but here are some of our favourites.

Confederation Bridge, NB to PEI

Confederation Bridge joins Prince Edward Island and New Brunswick, making travel throughout the Maritimes faster and easier. The curved, 12.9 km (eight mile) bridge is the longest in the world that crosses ice-covered water, and it has been considered to be one of Canada’s top engineering achievements since it first opened in 1997.

The Dempster Highway, Yukon and NWT

The Dempster Highway is 740 kilometres (460 miles) of hard-packed gravel road that winds its way through two mountain ranges (the Oglivie and the Richardson), crosses the continental divide three times, traverses the Arctic Circle, and loosely follows old dog team routes on its way to Inuvik and the Mackenzie Delta.

The Icefields Parkway, Banff to Jasper, AB

The Icefields Parkway stretches 232 km (144 miles) through the heart of the Canadian Rocky Mountain Parks World Heritage Site. It offers access to a vast wilderness of pristine mountain lakes, ancient glaciers and broad sweeping valleys. It even winds its way through two national parks, offering seemingly endless views of remarkable landscapes.

The Sea to Sky Highway, BC

The Sea to Sky Highway is the name given to a stretch of Highway 99 north of Vancouver that begins at Horseshoe Bay and runs for 134 km (83 miles) to the north—past Lions Bay, Squamish, Whistler and Pemberton. The Sea to Sky is rated as one of the most beautiful stretches of road in the world. (And little wonder.)

Cabot Trail, Cape Breton, NS

The Cabot Trail is considered to be one of the world's most scenic destinations. Hike and camp at Cape Breton Highlands National Park, play a round of golf at the famous Highlands Links or just drive and stare out the window at 300 km (186 miles) of highway, with its spectacular coastal views and wonderful highland scenery.

ONLY IN CANADA

Think a little downpour will slow us down? Not when Canada has experienced extremes such as these.

HIGHEST TEMPERATURE

45.0°C (113.0°F)Midale and Yellow Grass, Saskatchewan on July 5, 1937

LOWEST TEMPERATURE

-63.0°C (-81.4°F) Snag, Yukon on February 3, 1947

GREATEST RAINFALL (IN 24 HOURS)

49cm (19 inches) Ucluelet Brynnor Mines, British Columbia on October 6, 1967

GREATEST SNOWFALL (IN ONE SEASON)

45.0°C (113.0°F)Midale and Yellow Grass, Saskatchewan on July 5, 1937

HIGHEST TEMPERATURE

2,446.5cm (964 inches) Mount Copeland, British Columbia, 1971-1972

HIGHEST HUMIDEX READING

53.4 Castlegar, British Columbia on July 14, 1961

HOTTEST MONTH (AVERAGE MAX.)

35.8°C (96.6°F) Nashlyn, Saskatchewan on July 1926

COLDEST MONTH (AVERAGE MIN.)

−50.1°C (−58.2°F) Eureka, Nunavut in February 1979